How to Get Oil Paint Out of Hair?

Randy Charles
Randy Charles
Professional Painter

Hi, I’m Randy Charles, the creator and chief editor of this site Paintcentric. I’m a businessman now by profession, but I used to work as...Read more

I was painting my porch railing about two weeks ago when the wind blew my whole front hair onto the wet oil paint. It was a frustrating experience since I never wanted to involve scissors. But through trials and error, I discovered how to get oil paint out of hair.

Oil-based paints contain some pigments that form a paste and dry slowly. The clump makes individual strands resist combs and brushes. Keep reading this article to find solutions to remove oil paint out of hair fast without hurting the scalp.

How to Get Oil Paint Out of Hair?

Getting oil paint in your hair can be frustrating. Fortunately, many solutions can remove oil paint from hair without hurting the scalp and damaging individual hair strands. Below are crucial techniques for removing oil paint from your hair:

How To Get Oil Paint Out Of Hair

A Scrapping Process

Scrapping off the oil paint from hair with your fingernails is the best option due to its simplicity. You do not need assistance from anyone to undertake the process.

Grab and pull the affected hair with one hand tight. Use the fingernails of the other hand to pinch the paint and drag it down your hair.

Repeat the process several times until no paint is in the hair. The scrapping process can be time-consuming, but it is worth the investment. Be sure to work with small paint patches in the hair.

Using Shampoo

Clarifying shampoo is the best option for removing oil paint from the hair without damaging the strands and hurting the scalp. (Check Best Deals on Amazon).

Take the time to comb the hair and remove loose paint particles. Soak the hair with water and apply some amount of clarifying shampoo. Pay extra attention to the affected hair by scrubbing with shampoo. Rinse the shampoo and inspect the hair. Repeat the process if there are some paint particles.

Using Shampoo

Allow the shampoo to sit in the hair for 30-45 minutes. Rinse the hair and follow the conditioning treatment routine.

Toothpaste

Toothpaste is a readily available and inexpensive option for removing oil paint from the hair. It contains ingredients that separate paint particles from the hair strands.

Separate the section hair with paint and apply the toothpaste. Soak the hair with toothpaste well and allow it to sit for 10-15 minutes.

Use a wide-tooth comb to comb through the toothpaste. Exercise ultimate care to avoid damaging the hair strands and hurting the scalp. The process helps loosen and soften the paint.

Apply regular shampoo and rinse with warm water. Give the hair an excellent scrub to remove the remaining paint and toothpaste particles.

Dishwashing Soap

Dish soap contains ingredients that cut through the stubborn oil paint particles in the hair. It is readily available and inexpensive. (Check Best Deals on Amazon).

The grease-cutting soap is gentle on the hair strands and will not damage the scalp. Apply some dish soap onto the hands and massage the hair sections with paint.

Allow the dishwashing soap to sit in the hair for 15-20 minutes and rinse thoroughly with running water. Wash the hair with regular shampoo for better treatment.

Using Vinegar

Vinegar is another excellent technique for removing paint from hair. It is the best option for those individuals who can tolerate the distinctive vinegar smell.

Massage the hair with apple cider vinegar to break down the oil paint particles. I recommend paying extra attention to the hair sections with paints.

Allow the vinegar to sit in the hair for 20-25 minutes and comb with a detangling comb to remove the loose paint particles.

Use normal shampoo to wash the hair and remove the remaining paint residue. Allow the hair to dry and massage with reputable hair oil.

Using Olive Oil for Soaking

Olive oil is proven to work well at removing oil paint from hair. You will need plastic wrap, olive oil, and plenty of time to perform the process.

Using Olive Oil For Soaking

Apply a liberal amount of olive oil onto the hand and soak the hair. Wrap the hair with plastic wrap to trap the oil against the scalp.

Allow the olive oil to sit in the hair for 2-3 hours and remove the plastic wrap. Use a detangling comb to remove the soft paint from the hair.

Rinse the hair and condition it for a luxuriously soft effect. I recommend performing this ritual monthly, even without the oil paint in the hair.

Spreading Peanut Butter on It

Peanut butter is another household item with many uses. It contains oil substances that can break down oil paints from the hair strands.

Grab a chunk of peanut butter and spread it into the hair strands. Massage the hair with your fingertips and pay extra attention to the hair section with paint particles.

Allow the peanut butter to sit in the hair for 15-20 minutes. Keep massaging the hair again with your fingertips.

If the oil paint appears to have broken down, rinse the hair as usual and inspect it again. Repeat the process to remove all the paint particles.

Using Chemicals

I recommend this method as the last resort if the above techniques cannot remove oil paint particles from the hair. Most of these chemicals are harsh and can ruin your hair strands.

Mineral spirits, paint thinners, and turpentine are worth giving them a try. Apply a liberal amount of chemical of your choice on a rag and wipe down the paint.

Undertake the process several times to remove all the paint particles. Use a regular shampoo to wash the hair. Do not allow these chemicals to sit in the hair for an extended period.

How Do You Remove Paint from Hair when It Is Not Known What Kind of Paint It Is?

I love keeping unused paint tins in my garage for several reasons. My six-year-old son usually removes the paint labels for unknown reasons. I was painting my bedroom ceiling two days ago, and some drops landed on my hair.

How Do You Remove Paint From Hair When It Is Not Known What Kind Of Paint It Is

So, how do you remove paint from hair when it is not known what kind of paint it is? I recommend using dish soap or toothpaste. Apply a liberal amount of dish soap onto the hand and massage your hair. It will help remove the paint particles from the hair.

Toothpaste is an excellent option if the dish soap isn’t working well. It contains abrasive properties that break down paint particles. Use a regular shampoo to wash the hair and comb to straighten the strands.

Always wear a shower cap when painting the ceilings. It will prevent the oil paint from coming into contact with the hair.

How Should You Take Care of Your Hair after Removing the Paint?

All the processes mentioned above for removing oil paint from the hair usually damage the strands and make them dry. It also inhibits proper growth and enhances hair strand breakage.

How Should You Take Care Of Your Hair After Removing The Paint

I recommend conditioning the hair to increase its vitality and volume. Condition treatment makes the hair healthier, stronger and shined.

Another option is to utilize the household items to reverse the damaging effects. Prepare a mixture of avocado, olive oil, and essential oil for your hair.

Apply the paste starting from the scalp up to the hair ends. Cover the head with a shower cap for about 25-30 minutes. Use a regular shampoo to wash the hair and allow it to dry.

Conclusion

Oil paints can damage your hair if not removed immediately. It can make your hair dry and brittle in the long run. Do not freak if you find yourself in this predicament.

Use any of the easy and inexpensive steps mentioned in this article above. I do not recommend using chemicals like nail remover, turpentine, and hydrogen peroxide to remove the paint.

These chemical compounds can be harsh on your scalp, skin, and hair. I recommend using household items or seeking assistance from a professional salon.

Feel free to share this information with your friends or family if you find it helpful. Besides that, share your experience dealing with oil paint on hair in the comment section.

Randy Charles
Randy CharlesProfessional Painter

Hi, I’m Randy Charles, the creator and chief editor of this site Paintcentric. I’m a businessman now by profession, but I used to work as a painter earlier in my professional career. There is simply nothing about painting that I didn’t do as a painter. From painting a fridge to a multi-storied building, I left nothing. I retired from my painting job in the mid of 2018 due to back arthritis problems.

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